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Volume :7 Issue : 25 1987      Add To Cart                                                                    Download

Muslim Costumes at the Time of Granada’s Downfall, and Their Influence on Maghribi Garments (in Arabic)

Auther : Salih M.Fayyadh Abu Diyak

The paper opens with an introduction to the Muriskeans, whose glorious valorous fill golden pages in Arab-Muslim history. They were a people distinguished by their perseverance and diligence in preserving their distinct characteristics, despite the misfortunes and hardships, which befell them.

The paper also shows the smoothness with which new dressing habits developed among the people, similar to the spreading of songs. One consequence of this development was the appearance of certain form and articles, which were incongruous with the principles of the Islamic Shari’ah. Among these were felt caps, facial cosmetics, lownecks, and changes in the form and production material of footware, to make them extravagantly embellished in a way befitting the overelegance of the garments. These fashions may indicate the material prosperity of the Muriskeans. Evidently, they had a tendency to enjoy life and its pleasures, probably because of the psychological influences of the misfortunes and ordeals that kept testing them. They were unsure of their morrow, since their enemies were set to eradicate them. The muriskeans resisted their enemies bravely. They also called for help from fellow Arabs and Muslims. The assistance they received, however, fell far short of their needs that resulted from the gravity of their problems.

Ultimately, these problems forced them to scatter to their Diaspora, where they ried to preserve their culture. They re-named many of the places where they settled after their Spanish hometowns. They tried to retain virtually all aspects of their original life-style in the new settlements. Only with the passage of time they mixed with the native population, but they left behind distinctive vestiges still observable in the Algerian Tunisian, and Moroccan towns of the Maghrib today.

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