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Volume :33 Issue : 1 2006      Add To Cart                                                                    Download

Groundwater quality alterations in the vicinity of liquid and solid waste landfills in Kuwait

Auther : A. FADLELMAWLA, M. AL-SENAFY, A. AL-KHALID AND K. AL-FAHAD

Water Resources Division, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, 13109, Safat, Kuwait, Email:  msenafy@safat.kisr.edu.kw,

Tel: +965-4989889, Fax +965-4989819

 

ABSTRACT

 

A study was conducted to evaluate the impact of three landfill practices in Kuwait on the groundwater quality at the 7th Ring Road Landfill (L1), the Amghara Landfill (L2) and the Mina Abdullah Landfill (L3). All three landfills received or are receiving liquid and solid waste of different origins.  For the purpose of characterizing and monitoring, a total of 16 test holes and nine monitoring wells with depths ranging between 15 and 80 m were completed.  Samples were collected and analyzed from test holes, monitoring wells, existing wells in the vicinity, and waste trucks in addition to other potential groundwater contaminating sources.  The initial lithological results have ruled out the potential for impacts on the groundwater quality from L3 due to 60 meters of unsaturated zone that includes 12 meters of cemented low-conductivity chert.  Additionally, confining conditions were evident in the pressurized groundwater, which was encountered beneath the chert layer. Out of the 57 analyzed groundwater constituents, boron, nitrate, aluminum, lithium, fluoride, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), total coliform bacteria (TCB), and total dissolved solids (TDS) were found to be above the drinking water standards.  Interpreting these results in the context of the prevailing conditions of lithology, upstream groundwater quality, sources and operating conditions, only the elevated TPH and TCB in groundwater could be attributed to the landfills.  More specifically, at L1, the elevated TPH and TCB may be attributed to the landfill with a considerable level of confidence.  At L2, only the TCB elevation can be attributed to the landfill with such a level of confidence, while the TPH elevation is both insignificant and may be indigenous of the upstream groundwater.  For both landfills, the TCB plumes extend well downstream of the landfills (i.e. more than three km), whereas the TPH at the L1 landfill seems to be immobile.

 

Keywords: Downstream; Plume; Total coliform bacteria; Total petroleum hydrocarbons; Upstream.

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